Question about economic and balancing controls

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Question about economic and balancing controls

grampajohn
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This post was updated on .
Regarding the 2014 game specification, Dan Urieli asks:
In sec 3.1.2, first bullet (economic controls) - I believe I understood only the first part (0 < r < 1), but the part talking about -1 < r < 2 for storage devices wasn't fully clear to me. For instance, what does a value of 0 < r < 1 mean in that case (curtailing charging? curtailing discharging? not-curtailing?) ? I believe this is not specified. Similarly, what do values of r = -epsilon and r = 1 + epsilon mean?
For storage devices, there are three possible controls that can be applied:

1. Curtail charging, which generalizes to reducing the heat input for a hot-water heater or reducing the cooling for a cold-storage facility. This is up-regulation, corresponding to curtailment ratios 0 < r <= 1. We call it up-regulation because it reduces the demand side of the supply-demand balancing problem, equivalent to adding supply.

2. Add energy, to a battery or to a thermal storage device. This adds to the demand, so we call it down-regulation, corresponding to ratios -1 <= r < 0. It's hard to call it curtailment any longer, so we have generalized the terminology to "regulation" ratio.

3. Extract stored energy, possible with batteries but not with thermal storage devices. Since this is up-regulation, we use 1 < r <=2 for this case.

I'm sorry if this was not clear in the spec. I'll see if there's a better way to say it.

Does this answer your question?

John
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Re: Question about economic and balancing controls

grampajohn
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Oops - sorry, that was not clear either. My apologies.
grampajohn wrote
1. Curtail charging, which generalizes to adding heat to a hot-water heater or removing heat from a cold-storage facility. This is up-regulation, corresponding to curtailment ratios 0 < r <= 1. We call it up-regulation because it reduces the demand side of the supply-demand balancing problem, equivalent to adding supply.
No. Curtailment of charging is just that. It shuts off the battery charger, or the heating or cooling device. The ratio specifies the reduction in consumption with respect to the usage in the absence of the control. So if your hot-water heater would not have started during that timeslot, there is no effect. If it would have consumed 5 kWh, then a 50% curtailment would reduce that to 2.5 kWh.

I hope that is more clear.

John